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Dress Code

    • 1787 points
    • Posts: 215
     

    tdogg21

    most places i play require collars and no jeans or jean shorts.  and i like that.  i enjoy 'dressing like a golfer.'  but there is also a course i play regularly with no dress code.  it's actually in a PA state park right next to the Appalachian Trail.  doesn't get the high class clientele, but i enjoy the course.  i still dress nicely, but when i play in the fall, i'm most likely in jeans.

    however, i don't like when courses don't allow cargo shorts.  i don't get it.  i think they still look nice and honestly, they are more functional to me when playing.

     

    Good point on the cargo shorts.  I don't get it either.  They are functional and can look nice.  I once had a pair of greg norman shorts with a double side pocket on each side.  perfect for golf!!

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    tdogg21

    that's just the Hawaiian way.  it might be different. but it's their culture.  and i'm ok with that.  they aren't being disrespectful to anyone or the course, that is just how they were raised in their culture. 

    You are right, tdogg21. . . and I gather just that and mentioned it in my follow up postings after Devin commented.  But your take is right on it.  Good point!

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    big tony

    tdogg21

    most places i play require collars and no jeans or jean shorts.  and i like that.  i enjoy 'dressing like a golfer.'  but there is also a course i play regularly with no dress code.  it's actually in a PA state park right next to the Appalachian Trail.  doesn't get the high class clientele, but i enjoy the course.  i still dress nicely, but when i play in the fall, i'm most likely in jeans.

    however, i don't like when courses don't allow cargo shorts.  i don't get it.  i think they still look nice and honestly, they are more functional to me when playing.

     

    Good point on the cargo shorts.  I don't get it either.  They are functional and can look nice.  I once had a pair of greg norman shorts with a double side pocket on each side.  perfect for golf!!

    i actually don't like having a ball in my side pockets, but i don't mind them in the cargo pockets.  so if i play somewhere i'm not allowed to wear cargo shorts, i'm stuck not having a ball in my pocket.  not a big deal, but a minor inconvenience  for reasons i don't understand.

    • 3539 points
    • Posts: 607
     

    I always dress nice when going to the course, I enjoy it when the dress code is actually enforced. Funny story...some friends and I were playing at a nice private club in Charlotte and on the 4-5 hole one of my buddies shirt had come un-tucked, well out of nowhere comes a ranger and he politely tells my friend to tuck his shirt back in and enjoy our round. That was a new one on me but, I didn't really see a problem with it.  

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    noeldaof

    At any or many courses we play year in and out, there's always a dress code.

    What dress code does your course or the courses you frequently play have or follow on the course or at the clubhouse/restaurant?  Please tell us what you like or don't like about it.

    Here, at a couple of the courses we play most our golf, we follow the typical: Collared Shirt Required: No Jeans: No flip-flops: No Tank-Tops for on course and the clubhouse.  But always NO HATS inside the clubhouse at Crystalaire whether you dine or just passing through (sounds silly, but we like it that way).

    This simple codes are almost something sacred to the people where they play their golf and we follow their respect for a few reasons.  It brings me to mind about my late Greatest Of All Time, Mr. Ben Hogan, who has never stepped onto a course without being in his best.  the guy was just sharp all the time.

    Titleist were around in the 1930s (I think).  FootJoy has been around longer and forever. . . I wouldn't doubt if Mr. Hogan wore footJoys back then.

    Tell us about your dress codes.

    i have no issue with the hat rule for dinning in or even if you are passing through the clubhouse, but i think there should be something (like a grill room/bar) where you can stop in between 9s or even after your round and not worry about your hat.  i know it's the proper thing to do, but if i've been out playing in 90+ temps in the summer, i probably look a lot worse and less presentable without my hat.

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    tdogg21

    i have no issue with the hat rule for dinning in or even if you are passing through the clubhouse, but i think there should be something (like a grill room/bar) where you can stop in between 9s or even after your round and not worry about your hat.  i know it's the proper thing to do, but if i've been out playing in 90+ temps in the summer, i probably look a lot worse and less presentable without my hat.

    Hats on/off, is really no big deal and no issue until it has to be done automatically at a place-- I understand.  Most places wouldn't care if folks strolls in from the 18th and enjoy a meal and cocktails with their hats or rain gear on-- their business criteria is to sell-- and that's a good thing for them and its customer. 

    I also hear your thoughts that there should be something else or somewhere else you could come into after the round where it's ok to stroll right from the 18th.  Like a guys' room or the guy's clubhouse.  I've heard or know of a place where it's "Men Only" club where women, wife sister, daughter, may not enter. . . and if they are dropping off a passenger, the female may not be off their vehicle.

    This place I mentioned is far from that way, it isn't like that at all, the clubhouse on the course is the only place to go for all, unless during a short period in the summer where they open the patio/pool bar/snacks-- rarely anyone goes there, but it's a choice.  The buildings and the course were built in the 50s and it's small and not up to date with their equipments, but it's nice, very clean place.  It happens to be a private place and the hat thing has been an unwritten gesture since they started.  It's not a fancy place either, it's just one of the idiosyncrasy they've been following, and really not that big a deal but for whatever reason it's worth mentioning in this topic.

     

     

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    tdogg21

    noeldaof

    This, my friend, is one of the things I like about this (FJCommunity) website, is that many of you love nice things.  FootJoy!

    You know, I can't say that I've always been at my best, but then I've never been out of order either.  The efforts the day before the round, where I set aside what I'm wearing the next day along with the rest of the equipment being ready is comforting to me.  As my dad and and others say about golf, "preparation is everything", and it goes with just about everything we do whether it's our work in golf, the time we allow prior to tee time, and it definitely includes the way we dress.

    There is a course in Hawaii, Kawai Island, it's called Wailua Golf Course.  Great course!  Public/Muni I think.  I read a little about it, and it mentioned that it was one of the Amateur Championship site a few times.  So I played it since I had a few more days to stay.  Anyway, I just could not get used to the way they let players on "barefoot!" as in no footwear and tank-tops, ugh.  I was so surprised.  Other than that, it was a great course with two nines designed by two different guys as they started only with nine holes. . . I've only played it once, but I sort of miss it, although I doubt that I'd go barefoot in a tank-top. (lol)

     

    that's just the Hawaiian way.  it might be different. but it's their culture.  and i'm ok with that.  they aren't being disrespectful to anyone or the course, that is just how they were raised in their culture. 

    You are spot-on as it is a cultural identity of the island. When i played in Maui, most of the "Resort Courses" won't allow the locals to play on them unless they were guest or properly dressed as their business is to present the "dress code standard" that most of us are used to globally.

     

    -ICONs for ALL

    • 3627 points
    • Posts: 634
     

    There is a dress code at my club. It's pretty basic...no jeans, tank tops, etc..

     

    Essentially for the men it's a golf shirt with pants or shorts with no cargo pockets or holes. Plus no metal spikes. Seems easy to me. 

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    PatCCraig

    There is a dress code at my club. It's pretty basic...no jeans, tank tops, etc..

     

    Essentially for the men it's a golf shirt with pants or shorts with no cargo pockets or holes. Plus no metal spikes. Seems easy to me. 

    since your club has the rule, i'll ask you.  why no cargo shorts?

    • 3627 points
    • Posts: 634
     

    tdogg21

    PatCCraig

    There is a dress code at my club. It's pretty basic...no jeans, tank tops, etc..

     

    Essentially for the men it's a golf shirt with pants or shorts with no cargo pockets or holes. Plus no metal spikes. Seems easy to me. 

    since your club has the rule, i'll ask you.  why no cargo shorts?

     

    Personally, I'm not a fan so I'm probably biased in favor of the rule. I think it stems from baggy, big pocketed, cargo shorts that look too casual for golf. I've heard the argument "what difference does it make, shorts are shorts"...and a t-shirt is a shirt, but I wouldn't show up wearing one for my round at a friends club. 

     

    Just my two cents.

    • 3627 points
    • Posts: 634
     

    tdogg21

    PatCCraig

    There is a dress code at my club. It's pretty basic...no jeans, tank tops, etc..

     

    Essentially for the men it's a golf shirt with pants or shorts with no cargo pockets or holes. Plus no metal spikes. Seems easy to me. 

    since your club has the rule, i'll ask you.  why no cargo shorts?

     

    Personally, I'm not a fan so I'm probably biased in favor of the rule. I think it stems from baggy, big pocketed, cargo shorts that look too casual for golf. I've heard the argument "what difference does it make, shorts are shorts"...and a t-shirt is a shirt, but I wouldn't show up wearing one for my round at a friends club. 

     

    Just my two cents.

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    PatCCraig

    Personally, I'm not a fan so I'm probably biased in favor of the rule. I think it stems from baggy, big pocketed, cargo shorts that look too casual for golf. I've heard the argument "what difference does it make, shorts are shorts"...and a t-shirt is a shirt, but I wouldn't show up wearing one for my round at a friends club

     

    Just my two cents.

    That's a good attitude to address a dress code, PatCCraig!  You would be welcome to many clubs by your standards. 

     

    • 3627 points
    • Posts: 634
     

    noeldaof

    PatCCraig

    Personally, I'm not a fan so I'm probably biased in favor of the rule. I think it stems from baggy, big pocketed, cargo shorts that look too casual for golf. I've heard the argument "what difference does it make, shorts are shorts"...and a t-shirt is a shirt, but I wouldn't show up wearing one for my round at a friends club

     

    Just my two cents.

    That's a good attitude to address a dress code, PatCCraig!  You would be welcome to many clubs by your standards. 

     

     

    Thanks!

    • 691 points
    • Posts: 49
     
    I play at a lot of public courses in and around Chicagoland, as well as a few semi-private ones as well. And while I always dress for golf as if I were on "tour" (long pants, polo shirts, sweaters, etc.) and when it gets really warm out I will wear shorts but only ones that just touch the knee. But I must say that seeing what people golf in can just make you sick. This used to be a gentlemens sport, people played in sport coats and ties. Now you go to some of these public courses and you see people in jeans, baggy shorts, amd even worse track suits, yuck. I think more people should take their golf style points from people like Arnold Palmer, and Jack Nicklaus.
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    It says no jeans, and a collard shirt is mandatory, but I see people slacking all the time.  My favorite is the tank top with the farmer's tan.  If you're that set on wearing a tank top at least be tan.  I think sloppy people look foolish, but it doesn't bother me.  I try to keep it sharp all the time, especially on the course, because I like it. 

    Once the round is over wear what you like.  I love to give my icons a rest and put my flip flops on after walking a long round.  I've also got my loafers or boat shoes in my car encase flip flops would be a bad call.