Scuff Marks on White Dry Joys

Scuff Marks on White Dry Joys

    • 12 points
    • Posts: 1
     

    Looking for anyone with advice on covering up or repairing bad scuff marks on a pair of White Dry Joys. Starting to look bad but the shoes are still in great shape.

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    It's a new product on the market, it's called shoe polish, doh!!!

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    aside from going to a shoe repair, I use a blunt instrument like the butt of a butter knife to smooth the scratch then, force white boot polish into the scratch and then apply polish all over and shine. I hope that helps. 

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    Welcome to the site,,,,,, Maybe white acrylic paint, Im sure alot of responses will be coming!

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    The first thing I'd try (if you haven't already) is to attempt to buff out the scuffs with a cloth/sponge (would use damp rag as well).  If that doesn't help, you could try leather cleaner (Meguiar's makes a good leather cleaner) with a cloth. Hopefully these will help.

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    First, Stop kicking the tee markers.  I would try the smooth and then white shoe polish. I clean my shoes after every time I wear them. Ii would bet most of the people on this sight do also.  Take care of them shoes, they take care of you.

     

    Never use paint on leather.

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    I have tried a number of things and this is what I have found works about the best, short of going to a shoemaker and having them do the job. ( that can be pricey).

    Take a toothbrush and with baking soda, clean the scuff to get all the dirt out  making sure that the surface is clean and dry after. the take white shoe polish and work it into the scuff with a clean tootbrush. (Using a toothbrush is the best as it doesn't do further damage to the surface) Let  that dry and then put a light coat of mink oil on the spot and let soak in overnight. Coat again with mink oil the next day, at least 24 hrs. later, and lightly buff with a soft cloth. This seems like a lot of work, but it hasn't failed me yet.

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    eagle3

    I have tried a number of things and this is what I have found works about the best, short of going to a shoemaker and having them do the job. ( that can be pricey).

    Take a toothbrush and with baking soda, clean the scuff to get all the dirt out  making sure that the surface is clean and dry after. the take white shoe polish and work it into the scuff with a clean tootbrush. (Using a toothbrush is the best as it doesn't do further damage to the surface) Let  that dry and then put a light coat of mink oil on the spot and let soak in overnight. Coat again with mink oil the next day, at least 24 hrs. later, and lightly buff with a soft cloth. This seems like a lot of work, but it hasn't failed me yet.

    Thank you for posting this eagle.  This is a method I'm going to have to borrow from you.

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    Eagle, I tried that on a old pair of shoes, and it really works. Thank you.

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    you should do what fred said because it works

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    OK, this is a delicate problem, because you don't want to ruin the leather. Eagle has given you very solid advice, and it should work well. An additional option that is similar is to use SoftScrub on the scuff. Nowmthisnis extremely important! Put a small (nickel sized) drop of scrub on a damp rag. Gently, and I can't emphasize Gently enough...... Rub the scuff with the rag. If you think you're rubbing to hard go more softly. There are abrasives in SoftScrub, so be careful. But rub in and let dry completely. Then do the mink oil procedure Eagle recommends. SoftScrub has the abrasives and there is also bleach..... This works very well when done properly. One more thing.... Make sure to clean your shoes, especially white ones, after every use. That's the only way to keep them white and clean. All of my shoes get wiped down and then treated with leather conditioner after every wearing. And they all look like they just came from the factory.
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    Tar Heel
    OK, this is a delicate problem, because you don't want to ruin the leather. Eagle has given you very solid advice, and it should work well. An additional option that is similar is to use SoftScrub on the scuff. Nowmthisnis extremely important! Put a small (nickel sized) drop of scrub on a damp rag. Gently, and I can't emphasize Gently enough...... Rub the scuff with the rag. If you think you're rubbing to hard go more softly. There are abrasives in SoftScrub, so be careful. But rub in and let dry completely. Then do the mink oil procedure Eagle recommends. SoftScrub has the abrasives and there is also bleach..... This works very well when done properly. One more thing.... Make sure to clean your shoes, especially white ones, after every use. That's the only way to keep them white and clean. All of my shoes get wiped down and then treated with leather conditioner after every wearing. And they all look like they just came from the factory.
    I am going to try that on my shoes now ... I already wipe my shoes down after every round but I don't put a scrub on it I just use a damp towel to get the dirt or mud off of it
    • 3506 points
    • Posts: 1181
     

    good ole fashion saddle soap (the kind you would see in the lockeroom attendant's shop area, hot water, a good brush and elbow grease. It is a cheap and solid fix to this problem. They have always worked for my shoes.

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    hmm.....i always wipe mine down and make sure they are clean.  never thought about conditioning them after each round.  i'll have to try that.  Great advice!

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    Murf, Welcome to the forum, Sorry to hear about the scuff marks on the shoes. I would follow Eagle and Tar Heel's advice. They are very experienced at shoe care and their recommendations are based on their practical experience of keeping their shoes in tip top condition. They helped me with great shoe care advice for my Icons and I've never looked back.