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Strokes Gained Putting

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    Seems to me over the past couple of years, this relatively new PGA Tour stat has become the most over-used by TV analysts.

    Can anyone explain Strokes Gained Putting? In layman's terms, please, if that's even possible!

    I'm pretty sure it's a stat that is not usable by average golfers, like fairways, greens & putts!

    Is it over-used? or is it just me?

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    I've never fully understood it either.  I believe it is supposed to show how frequently one golfer gains a stroke--birdie, I guess--over the general field when on a green, either in regulation or not.  Have never figured out how it might apply to the average hacker.

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    Best way to describe the stat:

    The number of putts in comparison to the Tour average computed by the average number of strokes based on the distance relative to the hole (simple explanation - HAHA).

    The new "strokes gained-putting" stat measures the number of putts a golfer takes relative to the PGA Tour average, taking into account the initial putt distance on each green. In 2010 Luke Donald led the Tour with 0.871 strokes gained. That means in each round, he gained an average of 0.871 strokes on the field just from his superior putting ability. Here's how the stat is computed. Suppose, for example, a golfer one-putts from 33 feet. The Tour average to hole-out from that distance is 2.0 putts, so a one-putt gains one putt on the field. A two-putt neither gains nor loses, but a three-putt represents a loss of one putt (or stroke) against the field.

    From other distances, the strokes gained or lost are typically fractional. For example, suppose a golfer one-putts from eight feet. The Tour average from that distance is 1.5, so a one-putt gains 0.5 strokes, but a two-putt loses 0.5 strokes. If the golfer started from eight feet 10 times in the round and made half of them, his strokes gained would be zero—he gained 0.5 on five holes and lost 0.5 on the other five holes

    Read more: www.golf.com/.../strokes-gained-putting-behind-newest-pga-tour-stat

    -ICONs for All

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    i think it is over-used because i dont care how you won i just think its cool that you won

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    Hey TA3, thanks for that informative reply, and thanks for the link.

    Now that I understand what it's all about, I can safely say that I have no use for it. OMG, to listen to Tripp Isenhour go on and on and on about strokes gained putting, I want to rip my ears off!!!

    By the way, Tripp, Tiger putted WELL, he didn't putt good!

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    There is only one stat that really matters

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    bholley
    There is only one stat that really matters

    As always, you hit that "on the nose" Bruce.

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    I agree that the stat that matters most on tour is wins, but I look at golf stats in another way - how can they help me improve my own game? And it's quite clear strokes-gained-putting is useless to me!

    Cheers!

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    The number of drinks after the round?

    • 2758 points
    • Posts: 706
     

    Basically its how well or poor your putting compared to rest of the field.

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    Thanks for the explanation TA3.

    Never really understood it before (and can't really say I was that interested) but interesting to know and all it really tells me is who is better or worse than average without any more specific data. Guess if the info is available to Tour Players they could identify which parts of theIr putting are better/below the rest and give them stuff to work on.

    Generally though if you win the tournament or have a high finish you've putted better than the rest IMHO.

    • 5052 points
    • Posts: 1417
     

    Another stat that gives the talking heads something to talk about on the golf shows..Becoming a better putter requires sound putting mechanics, tons of practice, and a clear understanding of where that practice will have the greatest impact. Dave Pelz analyzed this quite well in one of his early books. He found that the percentage of putts made is a function of the distance of the putts attempted  - Not rocket science (Pelz was a rocket scientist, I think) - the farther you are from the hole, the fewer putts made. He narrowed down the distance where you have the strongest likelihood of improving your score by sinking more putts. As I recall, he claims that a putting distance of 4 or 5 feet is where more amateurs miss versus pros. Thus spending more time working on making putts from that distance will help you post lower scores...

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    Statistics and analyzation only complicate golf even more than all the rules, lol

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    Basically it is a stat to tell you if you are putting better or worse than your peers! It is that simple...

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    Looks like a few responses have been put out here.  My simple explanation was basically the same as Chris.  Gaining strokes against the field.