Divots?

Divots?

    • 1495 points
    • Posts: 208
     

    Can someone please explain why some people get full divots and others get the "exploding" divots? I tend to get more of the latter type of divots, where as you see the pros and high level players get full chunks of sod for a divot?

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    Higher swing speeds; steeper approach angles and resulting greater ball compression are the results that you see at the Pro level. Consequently, approach angles are different among every golfer (Pro or Am) so you will both see and experience different divot characteristics - IMHO.

     

    -ICONs for All

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    I'll take a shot at it, although I'm no expert. . . two things with variations; 1 is the angle of attack whether it's shallow would most likely crumble easily or the steeper angle digs deeper and shaves like a sod.  The other may have to do with the ground consistency where the dryer it is the lesser it holds together, and of course the wet/moist grounds would tend to hold together.  Anyway, any of these combination might explain it.  Of course, all of these combination will vary with how much power was applied to the shot.  It wouldn't matter what condition the fairways are, if it's just too steep an angle of a blow reaches the ground at over 65 mph, every part on the persons body would probably vibrate for a few minutes if the shaft haven't already broken in half. (lol)

    How'd I do?

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    I believe it all has to do with the way the club head moves through the turf. If you hit it "thin" ther will be a small divot because you didnt hit down through the turf enough. If you hit it "fat" you will have a bigger divot because you dug too much into the turf.

     

    You can actuall tell a lot about your swing by the divot you make. You can see the direction the club head was traveling. You can see how far you dug into the turf. Some players can actuall tell if the club head was open or closed by looking at the divot.

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    thomas alston iii

    Higher swing speeds; steeper approach angles and resulting greater ball compression are the results that you see at the Pro level. Consequently, approach angles are different among every golfer (Pro or Am) so you will both see and experience different divot characteristics - IMHO.

     

    -ICONs for All

    That's right
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    All good perspectives here. One additional element of course is the ground itself. Is it sand based? Is it more dirt? What kind of grass is it, which can very much impact the effect. The overall ground condition clearly has a big impact and will most certainly be a factor in a nice tight divot or a big old splat.
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    A lot of players are pickers, like Steve Stricker who rarely takes a divot.  Very shallow on the bottom.  Lots of good info here.

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    JBrown8451

    I believe it all has to do with the way the club head moves through the turf. If you hit it "thin" ther will be a small divot because you didnt hit down through the turf enough. If you hit it "fat" you will have a bigger divot because you dug too much into the turf.

     

    You can actuall tell a lot about your swing by the divot you make. You can see the direction the club head was traveling. You can see how far you dug into the turf. Some players can actuall tell if the club head was open or closed by looking at the divot.

    probably the best answer so far on this post...I like Tar Heels input as well regarding the type of ground and base of the ground of the course.

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    the biggest factor is how much of a divot do you take.  i don't usually take much of a divot, so i rarely have the 'full' pro-type divot.  and most of the time when i do take a divot it's in pieces.  now if i'm trying to hit it a little differently and hit down on, then i take more of a full divot.

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    Very intesting responses.  I would agree that the material, sand or dirt have a factor as well as angle.  Lots of good responses follow from other FJ memebers.

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    Regardless of the angle of attack, as Randy stated, it's tough to take a divot on a clay base course, especially in the summer. The course conditions can be more like hitting off of a mat.

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    If you want to know about divots ask Devin. I played with him and he takes enough divots to supply the entire cast of "Last of the Mohicans"

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    That's when you know you hit it well Bruce.  I'm an earth shaker also.

     

    TT

    • 2180 points
    • Posts: 344
     

    I have always been a "sod relocation" ball striker. I was taught to pinch the back of the before the bottom of my arch. There are pro's and con's to it, but works good for me unless the course conditions get extremely tight on lies.