MOI COR HYPE

MOI COR HYPE

  •  

    How much better is better? How much more is more?

    It seems as though the hype over new clubs from manufacturers is growing and growing but the increased benefits are shrinking and shrinking.

    I am referring to new designs in clubs that boast increases in MOI, COR, CT (that's a new one for me, "Characteristic Time") and any number of other acronyms.

    This is particularly evident in the Driver category as the driver is typically the most changed club (along with the putter) thereby making it extremely logical for golf manufacturers to "HYPE" these clubs.

    But as time goes on, there have been three aspects to this hype.

    1.  The boasts are becoming more and more the focal point in advertising the new clubs..........."longer, faster, more MOI, more COR, more CT (that's face flexibility and ball speed),etc. etc. etc.  

    2. The boasted percentages of increase in these areas is decreasing.  A few years ago you heard about 20%increases in MOI, COR, Distance, etc..  Thise numbers are dropping some even into the low single digits (Callaway)

    3.  The actual raw number of the increase is becoming less and less significant.

    So, when does all this hype become insignificant.  I don't think that time is very far away.

    Using a simple chart, you can see the decreased effect on all this "more this and more that"

    You have to start with a baseline number for any category of improvement.  For this illustration I used 100 as a base and that 100 baseline begins at an arbitrary time when any manufacturer began measuring a factor and making designs specifically to improve that factor's baseline. Then I added a percentage of increase and  then calculated the raw increase to the original baseline number:Note that the percentage of increase for 1 year is relative to the previous year's percentage of increase

    RAW INCREASE TO BASE

    BASELINE OF 100 100

    20% INCREASE TO 100 120 20

    15% INCREASE TO 120 138 18

    10% INCREASE TO 138 151.8 13.8

    5% INCREASE TO 151.8 159.4 7.6

    2% INCREASE TO 159.4 162.6 3.2

    The results show that as time goes on, the significance of improvements becomes less and less.

    Where does this all end and at what point do these increases lose their marketing effect,

    I hope never because I love new drivers!!!!!!!!!!!

  •  

    This chart looks better:

    RAW INCREASE TO BASE
    BASELINE OF 100 100
    20% INCREASE TO 100 120 20
    15% INCREASE TO 120 138 18
    10% INCREASE TO 138 151.8 13.8
    5% INCREASE TO 151.8 159.4 7.6
    2% INCREASE TO 159.4 162.6 3.2
    • 4617 points
    • Posts: 1289
     

    The club manufacturers love you Bruce if you believe that these statistical improvements can be accomplished with your swing

    I suspect that this statistical analysis simply acts as the marketing push or affirmation foe those who simply want to buy a new club. I think if you have a sound golf swing, you can find excellent results from less engineered club designs from earlier eras. Like clothing design, there is lots of hype surrounding the essential function of clothing covering the body in an effective and attractive manner. Make no mistake, the mission of a clothing or golf club designer is to get you to buy something new that they will sell to you regardless of whether you need it or not.

    Few golfers will ever quantify whether their newest driver has a measurable impact on their golf game. He the average golfer's score improved in the last 30 years along with the club design improvement? Regardless, I know and understand that new club excitement and if I could afford to, I would buy new clubs more often!!

    • 3688 points
    • Posts: 1031
     

    It's definitely been a few iterations since we've seen HUGE increases.  Nowadays manufacturers are right up near the legal limits of what they can do with things like COR.  So now they're having to find other ways to make the next best thing.

    Things like the SLDR and increasing loft and decreasing spin, etc.  

    Let's be honest though.  Any MFR can put out a new club and claim its THE NEWEST BESTEST THING EVAR! And they'll sell a bunch of them.  Because the golf world is full of people who like new shiny things and also people who will buy ANYTHING that might fix their golf game (well anything except for the two things that WILL fix it, lessons and practice time).

  •  

    The science behind the numbers is both real and measurable. Unfortunately for most players they do not make perfect contact. The numbers you see in the hype are the test numbers from perfect his using a swing machine. Were this gets interesting is looking at the numbers for non perfect hits. These numbers show real world playability improvements in YOUR game. Take the hype with a grain of salt,  get fitted and demo the new stuff.  When you find something that helps your game,  buy it and move forward with it.

    • 4617 points
    • Posts: 1289
     

    19hole
    The science behind the numbers is both real and measurable. Unfortunately for most players they do not make perfect contact. The numbers you see in the hype are the test numbers from perfect his using a swing machine. Were this gets interesting is looking at the numbers for non perfect hits. These numbers show real world playability improvements in YOUR game. Take the hype with a grain of salt,  get fitted and demo the new stuff.  When you find something that helps your game,  buy it and move forward with it.

    19hole is on the money with this assessment and analysis. However you cut it, the best improvements in scoring will come from improving your swing, chipping and putting..Proper fitting of the correct equipment for your game will no doubt improve your confidence in your swing. And we all know that an essential element of improving your swing is having confidence in your ability to become a beeter player.. Great equipment will help...

    • 3293 points
    • Posts: 881
     

    Thanks Bruce!  

    I recent read a piece from Frank Thomas (former Technical Director of the USGA) on COR/MOI where he ends the article by saying: "Unfortunately, this increase in distance will soon fade – five or six rounds if we are lucky – as soon as our habitually forced swing kicks back into its rightful place"

  •  

    Yep, the numbers do mean you will get more transfer of energy from you to the ball, even on mis-hits. Unfortunately, there is a limit to what can be done; however, manufacturers still have to make us buy new stuff. So, they create new ways to make things "better". The latest iteration? An adjustable, sliding weight so you can tailor the club to suit the flight you want. It will probably work great for those who hit the dead, solid, perfect. For us mortals, it's just stuff to make us want it, desperately.

    • 4131 points
    • Posts: 1095
     

    I think all of that information is very important to Professional that is fitting you for a new driver. Shaft, lie, loft, and all of the different heads you can buy. I have decided to rely on a paid professional to build the appropriate club for me. I quit thinking about all of the specs; it gets in the way of why I play golf to have fun!

    Find a Professional club fitter and let him do his job.

  •  

    I was talking to our Master Instructor yesterday about contact and hitting the golf ball.  He stated that most people are just afraid to hit their drivers.  They want to make something happen when they put it in their hands and they should just hit it.  Makes sense.  More to it, but that was the basis of our conversation.....to much thinking going on.....he also told me to quit thinking about the shanks when I have a wedge in my hands, relax and hit the ball.....

    • 1160 points
    • Posts: 251
     

    A five lesson plan with a PGA pro will usually show better results than a new club.