Rules Enforcement -- Tough to be "that" guy

Rules Enforcement -- Tough to be "that" guy

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    Played in a club tourney yesterday and members guest did a 'no-no'.  He had a caddie place a hat down at the top of deep bunker to help with his line.  It was the last hole and I was a bit "out of it" when it happened.  Thought about it few a few mins after we finished and decided to let it go.  Later when they awarded prizes, this guy wins a pretty nice prize with his score.  What would you all have done?

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    That is a tough call.  At the end of the day, the rules are the rules.  Generally in this situation, I would have a "just so you know" type conversation with the member about the rule and put the call on them and their integrity.  They should have assessed the 2 stroke penalty and moved on.  Can't believe the caddie would do this in the first place or the player would allow it.

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    I'd have to suspect that wasn't the only infraction from him that day.  And realistically he didn't know about most of them (most golfers dont - they play loose with the rules and don't realize it).

    A simple "just so you know"  as Mike_C mentioned is warranted for sure.

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    I wrestled with this some time ago asked how it would feel if I violated a rule, out of ignorance, and a fellow competitor enforced the violation. I would be ashamed and accept my penalty because the rules are there to keep the game fair. To that end, there's nothing evil about enforcing a rule and, who wants to win by cheating? If a competitor then calls you a "rules ***", simply ask, "Is that how you want to win?". We all MUST enforce the rules in competition, if solely to protect other competitors. If the violator becomes upset and calls you names, simply remove them from your gift list and, when no one is looking......  LOL

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    Should have called him on it.. Someone got jammed for a prize because of it!

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    You should have had someone from 3 states away who saw a video of it call in after the prize was awarded and report it... all kidding aside. Yes you should have brought it up but IMO once the round is over and the scorecard is signed it's a done deal, penalties should not be assessed after scorecard is signed no matter what evidence there is. If we could go back an assess all penalties in all sports after the fact it would be like watching curling, with your mother-in-law, completly sober, while everyone else in the other room is watching the Super Bowl.

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    I am no rules scholar but am well aware of them. Recently in our MGA championship I made one of those friendly "the next time this occurs" comment to a opponent and all *** broke loose. The guy stayed upset and went immediately to our director of golf who explained  to him that what I told him was correct. He also told my opponent that I shouldn't have made a suggestion but should have called a penalty on him.

    I realize that we all make mistakes. Is it me or does it seem there is less knowledge of the rules today as compared to ten or twenty years ago.?

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    Ugh... that's tough... sorry to hear.

    But, in looking back, since nothing was said during and after it occurred, and then realized after the crowning, nothing will probably change the outcome in that tournament.  It hurts, but, bringing it up to anyone wouldn't help-- if anything, it would probably backfire as sounding like a jealous looser.  

    The lesson learned was for the future. . . to call him on it.. . . but yeah, I agree with you.  It's tough to be "that" guy.

    Each year, we're in Team Play.  One of a very few times, I made a call.  My opponent was in the middle of a huge fairway bunker hitting his 2nd.  There were some leaves and debris behind his ball but he casually picked it up and cleaned around them.  I was right in front of him.  Just before he hit his ball, I asked him if he would consider his ball in the bunker.  He thought of it, and paused for a while and then he mumbled to himself, "sun uh by beach!" or something rather.

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    that's tough.  i think i would have tried to say something to him before the round was over.  but once the round was over, i would have probably let it go.  i might have gone to him with an "informative" comment, but only if i knew him.

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    Good discussion.  I did pose a "hypothetical" situation to the tournament director afterwards and suggested that he hold a more focused rules clinic every so often.

    @GolfGuyinTX -- I agree with you that there is less of an awareness of rules today. But I think part of it is that many people that entered the game just feel that the "rules" are for the pro's and not for the hackers. I routinely see guys improve their lies, take drops to their advantage, etc. In a past round, a playing partner's tee shot came to rest on the edge of the cart path and he asked me for a ruling. I told him he gets relief from the nearest point and he proceeded to drop the ball...which then rolled from the point of his drop 10 yards down a hill into the fairway. He seemed pretty happy with his luck until I explained the rule to him. As I knew this golfer reasonably well, it wasn't an issue.

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    When I play with my buddies our general rule is "don't get an advantage." If someone is on a cart path they just roll it into the rough rather than measure and drop it. If they hit one in a hazard then they drop near where it went out but not really making a big deal of how far from the hazard they dropped. My buddies are double digit handicaps and it's just about having fun for them. I am a little more strict with the rules than they are but I try to just keep things moving. That being said, when I play with my golf team I am a *** about the rules and drops. I quiz guys on their options and we as a team are known for being well versed in the rules of golf. Had a player call a penalty on another player for setting an extra club down in the hazard, it was "testing the condition" and he was enforced a penalty. He was furious but his coach told him it was a penalty and he calmed down.

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    I think the rules should be followed all of the time.  That being said, if you are not playing in a competitive round where it is a tournament or you are not playing for $$ (which I'm sure nobody does), the only person you are cheating is yourself (and maybe your handicap).  I agree with Whaql1 that, in non-competitive situations, if you just roll your ball off the path or take a drop near the hazard, no big deal as long as there is no advantage.  However, if you are in a competitive situation, all of the rules must be adhered to in order to protect the field and make it a fair competition.  

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    TNT009
    Should have called him on it.. Someone got jammed for a prize because of it!

    I agree 100%. When there is something other than the casual round being played, you have an obligation to play by the rules.

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    It's never fun to be that guy, but theres some folks (probably the ones that call 1-800-Rlues) that really get a kick out of it.  A kid we played with suckered someone into switching marks, then called the penalty on him.  There was actually an article in one of the Mags this month about it.  We cut it out and put it on his car.

    In all seriousness, if you had seen the caddy doing it, I think calling it then and there with a "woah, don't do that!  It's a two stroke penalty" would have been the right thing to do.  Since the round was over, like others have said the "I'm sure you didn't mean to, but just so you know..." conversation is probably the best; especially since it's not your club, and you'll probably want to get invited back.

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    always a tough call, I would like to say I would have said something but I imagine in the moment I would have kept quiet