Pace of Play Experiment in Alabama

Pace of Play Experiment in Alabama

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    Take a look at this story from PGA.com about a great course in Alabama that's hosting an experimental day of golf -- encouraging everyone to play in 3.5 hours. They are using several strategies and will measure to see which ones actually affect the time of a round, including ready golf, limiting lost ball searches, etc. It will be interesting to see the results - and great to see them implemented. 

    http://www.pga.com/news/golf-buzz/pace-play-farmlinks-golf-club-host-experimental-day-golf 

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    GOOD ARTICLE CHRIS. IT WILL BE INTERESTING TO SEE WHICH ITEMS SHOW THE MOST TIME SAVED.

    I KNOW THAT PLAYING FORWARD SAVES OUR REGULAR GROUP PLENTY OF TIME (WE USUALLY PLAY ANY OF OUR 18'S IN 2 3/4 HRS.- THAT'S FOR A 4 SOME>).

    THANX.

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    Last weekend my group managed to play in 2:55. The group behind us still had 7 holes to play when we were walking off the 18th green. Their tee time was 8 minutes behind ours!

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    We usually have a pretty good game on weekend's.  We have anywhere from 3-5 foursomes, sometimes even a fivesome depending on the number of guys.  Our usual round starts with the picking of teams @ 8:00 and 1st group goes off right around 8:15.  The first group is typically done by 11:30 and most stay right in line.  There will even be some groups that will go off the 10th hole and others that will start on the 7th or the 16th hole in order to not hold up others, therefor allowing all groups to pretty much finish up by noon.

    Pace of play is certainly a factor in my play.  I try and stick with my own club for just that fact.  I often turn down offers to play other courses as rounds can end up playing in 5+ hours.

    Great article Chris, thank you for sharing.  It will be interesting to learn their findings.

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    I can't describe how much of an issue this is in college golf. Some rounds are 6 hours!!!! Anything that speeds up the game is good for me. Great read, thanks Chris.

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    19hole
    Last weekend my group managed to play in 2:55. The group behind us still had 7 holes to play when we were walking off the 18th green. Their tee time was 8 minutes behind ours!

    Rick, if the rest of your group plays as well as you, I can see why it only takes 2:55. My groups average score is about 85 and we usually finish in 3:30 to 4:00, depending on the course (we walk 75% of the courses).

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    Great information, Chris.....you know I would really enjoy this course.....on a good day with no one holding us up our fivesome can do 3.5 easy.....and that is not playing turbo golf.........and we are walkers........unfortunately we played in 4.15 today with a very slow player today.....he is an older gentleman 76 and he plays slow and he is not going to change.....and he drives me crazy as well as the rest of the group......we play the senior tees, he is just deliverate...and has a slow routine.....do not play with him on a regular basis for that very reason......would like to play that course in Alabama.....tournament golf is crazy....it can and wil go 5-6 hours.....if they would start puting more players on the clock it might help.....I have had those rules read to me and they are confusing.....thanks for sharing, Chris.....

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    Interesting read and I love the idea!  It'd be nice if various courses were to do the same thing and all employ different strategies.  As you narrow down the ones you think have the most effect, put them in place and have another day and see if it truly makes the difference!

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    Whaql1
    I can't describe how much of an issue this is in college golf. Some rounds are 6 hours!!!! Anything that speeds up the game is good for me. Great read, thanks Chris.

    OH, MY GOSH!!! WHAT IN THE WORLD CAN TAKE STRONG YOUNG PEOPLE THAT LONG TO PLAY 18 HOLES OF GOLF?

    I CANNOT IMAGINE HOW THEY CAN ENJOY THE GAME WHEN IT TAKES THAT LONG.

    THAT'S UGLY!!!!!! IMHO

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    Good idea.  My normal foursome usually plays in 3.5 hours or less.  The main reasons we don't (when that happens) are slow people in front of us or difficulty finding balls in the early morning dew and low sun.  We've been making a conscious effort to carefully watch everyone's shots to their finish and to decide quickly if the ball can be found or not.  We also practice continuous putting unless you're actually standing on someone's line of play.  As a good example, today we had to look for balls on the first and eighth holes, plus drive past many of our shots and then back to find the actual location of the ball.  We still finished in 3.5 hours--and were held up on three or four holes by the twosome (!) in front of us.

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    Whaql1
    I can't describe how much of an issue this is in college golf. Some rounds are 6 hours!!!! Anything that speeds up the game is good for me. Great read, thanks Chris.

    Wow! I had no idea it had become that bad in the college ranks. It sounds like a lot of "over-reading" in the short game and putts. They need to enforce the penalties - that's the only way to get their attention.

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    fredcloss
    Whaql1I can't describe how much of an issue this is in college golf. Some rounds are 6 hours!!!! Anything that speeds up the game is good for me. Great read, thanks Chris.Wow! I had no idea it had become that bad in the college ranks. It sounds like a lot of "over-reading" in the short game and putts. They need to enforce the penalties - that's the only way to get their attention.

    That was almost the norm, I remember standing on a par three with 4 groups once.  

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    I read the article and it seems that one add'l way of encouraging an increased pace of play would be to offer a lower rate to groups that were on pace and higher rate to those who didn't.

    Re: college/amateur golf, I can attest to those painful rounds -- in my part of the world where the amateurs are so focused on getting to the next tier they are encouraged by their coaches to take 5-10 practice swings as part of their pre-shot routine. In addition, because most of these guys can reach the long-par 4's and 5's of normal courses in 2 two, even from the back tees, groups are always waiting.  It doesn't help that when golf is shown on TV there are very few commercial breaks and you see that the 99% of professional's do the same

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    Devin_Gmitter

    fredcloss
    Whaql1I can't describe how much of an issue this is in college golf. Some rounds are 6 hours!!!! Anything that speeds up the game is good for me. Great read, thanks Chris.Wow! I had no idea it had become that bad in the college ranks. It sounds like a lot of "over-reading" in the short game and putts. They need to enforce the penalties - that's the only way to get their attention.

    That was almost the norm, I remember standing on a par three with 4 groups once.  

    That happens quite a bit, Devin. There are 2 holes at our home course that really get backed up and the worst part is that they are holes 2 and 3. 2 is a par 4 with woods right, OB left, and a bunker in the middle of the fairway (about 230-240 to carry it but it psychs players out), guys have a hard time finding the fairway. Not to mention the green is huge so guys are 3 wiggiling often as well. Hole 3 is a narrow par 3 with water right and it takes guys forever to hit the shot. Easily there will be 3-4 groups on 2 tee, one in the fairway, one on the green, 2-3 groups on 3 tee and 1 group on 3 green. This past year we put 15 minutes between tee times and that helped but it was still backed up.

    Fred, the problem is that there is no one around to enforce penalties. The coaches are driving around but for the most part the guys are on their own. Big issue in D3 golf. This past weekend I came up on a group looking for a ball in the rough, my first question was "How long have you been looking?" Response: "Like 10 minutes!" You only get 5 minutes to look for a ball!! Things like that really take up time. Not to mention that IMO college players in general are slow: taking too long to hit, overreading putts, searching for the exact distance, all kinds of stuff. It's hard to watch sometimes.

     

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    miniwarmth
    I read the article and it seems that one add'l way of encouraging an increased pace of play would be to offer a lower rate to groups that were on pace and higher rate to those who didn't.

    Re: college/amateur golf, I can attest to those painful rounds -- in my part of the world where the amateurs are so focused on getting to the next tier they are encouraged by their coaches to take 5-10 practice swings as part of their pre-shot routine. In addition, because most of these guys can reach the long-par 4's and 5's of normal courses in 2 two, even from the back tees, groups are always waiting.  It doesn't help that when golf is shown on TV there are very few commercial breaks and you see that the 99% of professional's do the same

    And what people see on TV is what they carry to the course.....TV golfers slow down play.....anyone heard that before....