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Riding a Golf Cart or Time Bomb

    • 1613 points
    • Posts: 115
     

    I know of a cart that its' battery recenty exploded. Lucky no one was injured. It got me to thinking about the proper care of batteries on golf carts, and with question how much attention is really given to the carts. Other than clean them up, drive them on a cart barn, and hook them to a charger.

    My experience says that can be dangerous, but of course I am not an expert. Also I know golf cart companies will not release any information that could hurt their business. Example I knew one golf cart company that had defective bag straps for years. Then one year I was at a tournament that they were hosting. I met three of the executives, and told them I knew of a problem with their carts that I wanted to make them aware. They were happy to hear suggestions, and I explained that a high percentage of their bag straps were defective. They laughed and said they were aware of that for years, and started walking away. I stopped them and ask... "what about the damage done to the golfers clubs has they bang off the cart path?" They looked like a deer caught in the headlights, and asked did it happen to my clubs. Of course they had.. anyway shorten the story they replaced or repaired my club three different times, never with any arguement.

    The reason golfers had not complained they always thought it was an accident, and the course management would often explain that "they", the golfer, must not have proper latched the strap. I had discussed this with one of the head pros' once and like the executives he knew about the problem.. it had happened to him several times. I asked why then didn't he warn the golfers at his club, and they could have hooked a small bungy cord, like a safety clasp. That way if they bag strap did not hold the bags would not fall off the cart.

    The company decided it was time to correct the problem, and I have never seen it happen again., sometimes simple awareness helps.

    This is why I am looking into batteries. Awareness.

    I have not finished the article yet, but I would like to offer an early preview to this forum for feedback. I have been to three different courses in the past couple of days, playing with friends. Each course I have raised the seat and looked at the batteries.. S C A R Y.... corroded cables, and some it is easy to see water levels have not been checked. As the weather warms up this can be a dangerous situation..... or maybe not.

    Check it out www.seniorgoler.us/carts.htm

    Regards to All

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    Definately an issue of concern as to the potential danger or making everyone more conscience to playing the sport as intended: walking....

     

    Thank you for bringing this to our attention.

     

    -ICONs for All 

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    that sucked good thing no one was injured

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    INTEESTING POST SENIOR.

    MANY YEARS AGO I HEARD A STORY ABOUT A GOLF CART BATTERY EXPLODING AND SEVERELY INJURING ONE OF THE RIDERS.

    I DON'T REMEMBER WHERE AND I HAVE NOT HEARD OF IT HAPPENING SINCE.

    KEEPS US INFORMED.

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    Senior... This is incredibly informative and interesting. When you're out on course enjoying a round of golf you just don't think of how some of these things are dangerous. Like in life, some things can go wrong....
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    Fortunately for me our club rotates their carts very 3 years.  But it is easy to see who is maintaining carts by the tires, steering, and overall look.  Guess we should be careful when visiting other courses.

    • 1613 points
    • Posts: 115
     

     

    I agree that rotating carts every three years is a big improvement over some clubs that run the carts until they collapse. Still to properly maintain batteries they should be checked, and serviced every 5 charges.

    I really don't think this is a courses (most courses) procedure (checking batteries every 5th charge).

    So far I find only a few comments about the number of battery fatalities, and injuries. I am still checking, but there appears to be about 7,000 yearly related to auto batteries. Golf courses, I am sure, would not release that type information. Sweep it under the rug.

    It is a problem like bag straps, golf shoes (shank), and now batteries. What they have in common is that a low percentage are impacted. So if only 5% of something is impacted then it is tolerated as not a problem. Make me think of the Firestone tire situation. Firestone “took” the blame, but my opinion it was the design of the vehicle. Most all mishaps were the same tire, same location. It was the tire next to the exhaust system that overheated the tire.. A tire that was not properly inflated. However the expense of recalling all those vehicles would be more that the tires. A small percentage of events, costing only a few lives, was not worth the expense. They just change the design of the next vehicles.

    The golf shoe industry spent a lot of money designing good looking shoes, and comfortable. What the golfer did not see was the money saved on putting in a inexpensive shank that would hold up under the majority of players. Especially those that only played a few time a year. At least through the warranty period. Then, like the bag strap problem, most golfer did not realize the shank had given out, and the shoes were not properly supporting the repeated weight transfer to the front foot that takes place in the follow-through causing neuroma, or a pinched nerve, at the bottom of the foot. It typically occurs between the third and fourth toes.

    www.seniorgolfer.us/shoes.htm

     

    The exception is, in my opinion, Footjoy and Adidas. Both these fine Companies build a good, strong performing shoe. As for Foot joy they have held up exceptionally. The only shoe they make that broke down (for me) was the contour. That was a long time ago, and they have probably put in a better shank. The other types of Footjoy are ahead of the curb.

    Now back to the battery whose responsible for the safety of the golfer? I say it is the golf course, but the cart manufactures could put in a safety shield between the battery and seat. Ultimately it is up to us. Hard to believe, but before I go out I lift the cart’s seat and look at the batteries. If I see a lot of corrosion I ask for another cart.. The course may not have any safe carts, then I will walk, and let someone else drive the cart with my bag… LOL

    Regards

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    i never heard of anything like this before...thanks for sharing.

     

    • 1613 points
    • Posts: 115
     

    No problem and I am still looking into it.. if there becomes enough awareness the course will take care of the problem due to liability. Prehapes the golf cart industry will add a protective shield.

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    that's interesting.  i guarantee most courses just hose off the carts, put them in the barn, and charge them up.  honestly, it's usually a bunch of kids working who don't know or are properly trained for cart maintenance.  it's something courses are going to have to think about and change the way they handle it.

    • 1613 points
    • Posts: 115
     

    I really agree golf courses are going to need to pay attention. It may be a service a local company could provide.. weekly maintainance of golf carts.

    I raised the seat and took a picture of the battery of a golf cart at one of the more exclusive clubs. www.seniorgolfer.us/carts.htm

    The battery has a hole in it from heating.

    Regards

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    that is crazy.  I am glad I walk most of the time, even more important that our course leases carts and shelf life on our course is 2-3 years and then they are gone...

     

    Take care, and more walking is necessary...