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Ball Mark Repair

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    There have been several discussions on this topic, however noone has addressed it from a Course Superintendents side. Do we have anyone out there in this category??I recently read  an article in one of my mags that referred to this problem. The superintendent that discussed this issue stated that the old method of shoving the repair tool in and lifting the mark tears the grass roots and causes a longer repair time on the green. The new method that they have found basically pushes the mark toward the center and does not  tear the rooting system as badly. He claimed that by doing this, repair time is about 2 to 3 weeks shorter. The way it was explained is that you insert the repair tool in and twist the sod so as to cover the mark and thereby creating less harm to the putting surface and root system. Of course, tamping the repair down is also a must.

     

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    I've read this as well.  I am certainly not an expert but it seems like it might be more effective.

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    Eagle, I saw the same thing. I do a bit more "twisting" as opposed to lifting the mark since a prop gave me similar advice a couple years ago.

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    There's a guy that works at my club that comes out in the mornings (before the first tee time, 6:30am in the summer) and goes from green to green with this type of tool described.  It actually looks like a cleat spike to me but it is in a longer hollow tube and he puts the tube over the mark and pushes the handle down which moves the cleat looking object down in a twist motion and takes the divot right out. 

    Not sure if this is exactly what the article spoke of, but it seems to do the job quickly.  I don't know a thing about repair time though or if there is any real difference.  I could always ask if I see him at the club anytime soon.

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    EMKelly0106

    There's a guy that works at my club that comes out in the mornings (before the first tee time, 6:30am in the summer) and goes from green to green with this type of tool described.  It actually looks like a cleat spike to me but it is in a longer hollow tube and he puts the tube over the mark and pushes the handle down which moves the cleat looking object down in a twist motion and takes the divot right out. 

    Not sure if this is exactly what the article spoke of, but it seems to do the job quickly.  I don't know a thing about repair time though or if there is any real difference.  I could always ask if I see him at the club anytime soon.

    I wish someone would invent a model to attach to a golf cart

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    There is a video on the USGA website, course care section. They do not recommend twisting, because that kills the grassroots. 

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    EM, the insight I have on repair time is this. A ball mark properly repaired will take a few days to recover. One that is not repaired, or takes a day or so, can take as much as 4 weeks to "heel" up fully.

    When I learned the game of golf back in the day in Chicago, the guys that taught me the game also owned the course I played at, and are still great friends of mine. Jay taught me this and always told me, whenever you walk on a green, always fix your ball mark plus at least 2 others that have been left unrepaired. His message was that with stewardship like that, the greens would stay in top shape. That was almost 20 years ago and I always heeded his advice.

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    Kelly, I haven't seen that type of tool you spoke about, probably  available only to courses,  but according to the article, even if you have one of the older type ballmark repair tools,  you just go in about a half inch and twist the sod  inward in a number of places toward the mark and then tamp down the mark, the repair time to normal is greatly increased. They now make a new tool to make this type of repair that is like the old ones, but shorter tines.

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    eagle, I've talked with a couple of superintendants, and they agree with what you read - tap it down w/ your putter from the high side of the mark, then use the divot tool to push the outside of the mark in towards the center.

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    I noticed the same thing that if you lift up you tear the roots versus twisting the ball mark and than flattening...

    This is the method I've always used.

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    I have seen this meathod in print and use it as well. Now if we could only get enough of those non-repair types to comply,there might not be as many divots come Sept.

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    Just yesterday, 25 Sep, was discussing this with the local pro and he showed me a method of repairing older marks that have not been repaired and new ones where the sod has been knocked out by the ball landing in such a way as to dislodge the sod. He stated that if the sod is dislodged and comes out, throw the little piece away. Take your reair tool and insert it into the mark about 1 1/2  to 2 1/2 inches ad turn it around and pull the plug out that is on the tool. Then gently move the surrounding sod back toward the hole and tamp down the repair. This is also done with an old mark that is browning out and needs repair. What you are basically doing is what is done under normal conditions and is known as aerating the green. There is little to no harm done and the green recovery time is about 1 to 2 weeks with little to no obvious marks left.

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    Good info to know and pass on. 

    Now if we can get everyone to follow.

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    Thanks, this is important info...also use a scotty cameron pivot tool and you will have an easier time fixing your ball marks!