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Interesting article on Driving vs Putting

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    Interesting article on the effects of driving vs putting capabilities on the PGA tour professionals.

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    can't open it...what did it say Mark??

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    try sharing the link again.

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    For PGA Players, Driving Now Beats Putting as the Most Lucrative Skill

    As golf courses used by the Professional Golfers’ Association have changed in recent years—with the fairways getting longer, the grass height in the rough being cut shorter, and the cups being shifted to locations that are harder to reach—driving has replaced putting as the professional golfer’s top money-making skill, according to a study by Carson D. Baugher and Jonathan P. Day of Western Illinois University and Elvin W. Burford Jr. of Junior’s Shaft Shack in Forest, Virginia. Previous studies showed that putting was a player’s most lucrative capability, but drawing on recent PGA Tour data, the researchers found that a 1-standard-deviation increase in driving distance would have boosted a player’s earnings by an average of $671,779.15 in 2013, whereas the same relative increase in putting skills would have raised his earnings by just $510,195.91. Iron, chipping, and sand skills remain significantly less important than driving and putting.

    Journal of Sports Economics  March edition

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    I would look at it like this, getting the ball in the hole is the most important thing so it's obvious putting would be key.  I would guess if your spending  much time in the sand or chipping your not making birdies anyway so it makes sense. Driving well leads to hitting greens and

    I think for weekend players chipping and putting are extremely important because we don't hit near the amount of greens the pro's do.

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    tee2green

    I would look at it like this, getting the ball in the hole is the most important thing so it's obvious putting would be key.  I would guess if your spending  much time in the sand or chipping your not making birdies anyway so it makes sense. Driving well leads to hitting greens and

    I think for weekend players chipping and putting are extremely important because we don't hit near the amount of greens the pro's do.

    I couldn't agree with you more about the short game for weekend players.  Just as an example, last weekend a guy in our group only hit one green in regulation in a round of 18 holes- obviously it was the short par 4, about 330 yards...  But because he got up and down about 90% of the time, he's able to score one over in a par the 72 course.

    That is something I could embrace- I'm not a good golfer, but that right there... the chips and putts... that's good stuff we could all use.

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    So now it's drive for dough and putt for a little less dough. :-)

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    I'll go with driver 49% and putter 51% in preference... You can make up ground by sinking putts, see last Ryder Cup!
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    I'll go with driver 49% and putter 51% in preference... You can make up ground by sinking putts, see last Ryder Cup!
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    I believe the putter is the difference.  The article says PGA well to me that could be any PGA sponsored event not the Tour.  The Tour winners are usually the best putter or very near the top for the week.  Rarely is the top driver of the ball and that needs to defined, is it the longest, most accurate, or overall, the winner.

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    I think the is correlation: Longer drive, shorter approach shot, shorter more accurate club for next shot, closer to the pin easier putt.

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    Getting it in the fairway is key.  Whatever you have to do to get it in the fairway.  Three wood, hybrid, choke down on your driver, hit a long iron, whatever.  Get it in the fairway.

    Then putt the lights out.

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    MarkWDallasTx
    I think the is correlation: Longer drive, shorter approach shot, shorter more accurate club for next shot, closer to the pin easier putt.

    Mark -- I think you've got it right and stated it in a way that makes sense. Also this study seems to draw a conclusion similar to the Broadie book on "Strokes Gained...".  

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    My own personal argument on all of this (as I believe I've posted here before too) is that the driver is far more important to ones game/score initially.

    Those new to the game can't hit a fairway (or even close to a fairway) often if ever.  And until you're at the point where you aren't looking for a ball on every single hole (hopefully minus the par 3s) you are going to be so far down on strokes before you can even engage your short game or putter that it simply doesn't matter if you work on those or not.

    If your game is at the point where you're hitting a few fairways and generally can find your ball even when hit offline then yes the short game and putting are places that you really should work on as they'll cause you to lose more shots than the longer game.