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Augusta's Eishenhower pine is gone

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    Wow, that is a big deal...that will allow the hole to play very differently.  

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    Tar Heel
    Augusta is like Disney. They can turn that place into make believe

    Isn't that the truth!  I'm sure they will come up with a replacement as it is such an integral part of that hole.  They probably have a like replacement waiting somewhere given their prior concern of the tree health and longevity.

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    My guess is they will will put another tree there or something

    • 2894 points
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    They will have another tree in place within a week or two, they won't let mother nature win.

    • 2894 points
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    They will have another tree in place within a week or two, they won't let mother nature win.

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    And now I hear there is discussion about what to do with the wood from the tree. Any place but Augusta would probably make it into Christmas ornaments and sell them. Do you think they'll use the wood to make some sort of memorabilia? And do you think they'll sell them, or give them to members, patrons and tour players?

    • 1764 points
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    Sad to hear about the original tree.

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    I think they should send at least a large chunk of it to Ike's farm in some form of a memorial.

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    The could use the tree to make new benches, tee markers, etc. As for a replacement tree, given that pines have VERY deep tap roots, I don't know if they can transplant one. Is anyone here a horticulturist?

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    Not a horticulturist, but not afraid to ask the internet.  My brother in law has 80,000 loblolly pines growing on his land in southwest Tennessee, which were planted by the National Forestry Service.  They are good for one for thing in the south, green pollen on our cars during the season and they do not help folks with allegeries.  Asside from that.  Quote the internet:  "Only a handful of the more than 100 pine species are regularly cultivated in gardens, since many species have very specific growing requirements and will not live outside their native range. However, most cultivated species are adaptable to a wide range of conditions and will survive the transplant process with minimal trauma. Species such as loblolly pine transplant especially well......" according to what I have read, the fellows at the course had a replacement growing in the event of such an emergency.......what ever they do with the remaining pine wood will be in good taste.....no Graceland trinkets......  

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    Chuck seeing pine pollen as green instead of yellow might be an indication of color blindness. It is nothing to be worried about but you can take some tests to check the severity. At the very worst you might wind up sporting some color combinations that Fred has been seen wearing.

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    bholley
    Chuck seeing pine pollen as green instead of yellow might be an indication of color blindness. It is nothing to be worried about but you can take some tests to check the severity. At the very worst you might wind up sporting some color combinations that Fred has been seen wearing.

    Give a feller a break......Yes, yes, yes, like Fred, I too wear that yellow or green or whatever color you want to call them...it builds character....and you are right as usual, it is some shade of yeller....you can see the **** stuff flying through the air as you walk the golf courses as you get teary eyed and begin to sniffle from being overjoyed, I guess..........."in the pines, in the pines, where the sun never shines", as the song goes....and we have plenty in GA and SC.....thanks for correcting my inaccuracy which could have been caused by being led astray in my youth by living in the hills of TN and we all know that corn won't grow on rocky top......or the only type that does is not used for eating.....that stuff does effect your eyesight eventually.......so, I guess I'm seeing green......ha...ha....with all due respect.....  :-)

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    Chuck, I wasn't trying to correct you this time. The inability to tell yellow from green is a symtom of color blindness. People with this often see the yellow pine pollen as green.

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    bholley
    Chuck, I wasn't trying to correct you this time. The inability to tell yellow from green is a symtom of color blindness. People with this often see the yellow pine pollen as green.

     No problem, my wife accues me of being various stages or blind and often deft when it comes to not seeing things that need to be picked up around the house or not hearing what she says......you know selective listening or avoiding things.....not color blind, just maybe should clean my glasses more often....have a great week.....and keep them in the fairways....and by the way, if you would keep that yellow stuff up you way, I would greatly appreciate it.....ha..ha...one southern gentleman to another....chuck  

    • 303 points
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    It is sad to hear about such a historic tree going down on one fo the worlds greatst golf courses.  I am sure with all the history and because of Augusta National's strong recognition of asthetics they will replace this tree with something else prior to the tournament being held in April.