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GREAT COLD WEATHER BALL

    • 1427 points
    • Posts: 109
     

    Must go to lower compression ball.

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    GolfGuyInTx

    I have found that as the temperature drops so should your balls compression level.

    Agreed.  Welcome to FJC!

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    MyFeetAreHappy

    I play in Southern New Hampshire right up until the snow flies and here's what I do:

    I start by keeping my golf bag inside the house the night before. I play with hand warmers in my big Titleist fleece mitts. I keep 2-3 balls in those mitts and rotate every hole. Keeping your balls warm "artificially" is technically against the rules, but I do it in casual golf - it's no fun hitting cold rocks!

    I do the same- I bring the clubs indoors (but not the garage- it's cold there, too.)

    Whenever I forget the bag in the trunk, the balls are soaked in hot water while I have breakfast.  Drivers can crack on rocks!  (even though my clubhead speed isn't that fast.)

     

     

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    ProV1Y ) ***x)

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    Once a ball gets cold, it will stay that way. Putting them in mitts may psychology help but in reality they would need an hour to return to normal temps.

    I have not heard of compression in many years.  I was not aware there are compression numbers for balls now a days.  

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    NCBob
    Once a ball gets cold, it will stay that way. Putting them in mitts may psychology help but in reality they would need an hour to return to normal temps.

    I have not heard of compression in many years.  I was not aware there are compression numbers for balls now a days.

    officially i don't think there is compression numbers anymore.  but i'm pretty sure they are still there.  they still make a a woman's ball, and i'm guessing that's a lower compression than a tour level ball.  so many people didn't understand compression and the number, i'm glad companies went a different direction.

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    WEll, sure there are, NCBob.  Haven't you heard of the Wilson 50?  Compression is just not the hot ball identifier it was when the ball cover was balata.

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    Somehow, I have a feeling that a response to this thread by BHOLLEY has been blocked by the FJ filters....

    Having said that, I agree that keeping the golf balls in a warmer climate is good, but I am not aware of a "temperature proof" ball on the market.  I have found that playing a longer club accomplishes the same thing.  Play your regular ball (especially if you are comfortable with the feel of the ball) and go with a longer club.  

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    Great advice Todd. Jack Nicklaus once wrote he used 100 compression balls, year 'round, such that he didn't have to become accustomed to a different "feel" at impact. Knowing that temperature does affect compression and, subsequently, distance, hitting the same ball using one more club (and perhaps gripping down 1/2"), works very well as the temperatures drop. Still, if one can find a ball that simply goes further in cold weather, it must help scoring as it's easier to hit a good shot with a 7 iron than it is with a 6 iron.

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    Here is how Titleist Customer Service would answer the question of cold weather effects on golf balls.

    Golf balls are designed to work best at temperatures around 70°F.  If they get a lot colder than that, the feel will become harder, there will be a moderate loss of distance, and the greenside responsiveness will decline.  Much hotter than that, and durability may suffer, there may be excessive spin, and any distance gain will be minimal or nonexistent.  Thus, we recommend storing golf balls indoors at room temperature between rounds, so that they remain near 70°.  

    Thank you for your question regarding Titleist golf balls. While we do not have specific data available to be shared, there are really two aspects to the question of temperature: the temperature of the ball itself, and the temperature of the air it's flying through. When the ball gets cold, the materials lose some resilience ("bounciness") so they come off the clubface slower and thus lose some distance. The materials also firm up, which makes the ball feel harder on impact. Since most golf balls these days use similar materials inside, these effects will also tend to be similar. Of course, these factors can be easily minimized or eliminated by not letting the ball get cold. We always recommend that golf balls be stored indoors at room temperature between rounds, and that's especially important during cold or hot times. If it's really cold outside, it's not a bad idea to alternate two balls hole-by-hole, keeping the idle one in a warm pocket.

    The air temperature affects ball flight because colder air is denser ("heavier") and thus caused greater aerodynamic drag. There is nothing you can do about this one, and it will affect different types of balls in essentially the same way. It's not a huge effect but it can be significant. The distance loss between a 70° day and a 40° day, for example, will be somewhere in the ballpark of 2%.

    • 247 points
    • Posts: 7
     

    I am a die hard golfer through Colorado winters and try to play 2-3 times per week, even during the winter.  I always switch to any low compression golf ball when it is cold and I definitely notice a difference.  As CTiger mentioned, the loss of distance is partially because I have so many layers on, but I have played hundreds of cold weather rounds with various golf balls and the lower the compression, the farther they go (especially when it is below 50 or 60 degrees).  I typically use the golf balls I find during the summer and throw into my "winter golf balls" box.  So I wouldn't say I have identified a favorite, but anything "soft" like a Titleist DT Solo, Nike PDSoft, Bridgestone e6, etc... I'm not expecting to play my best golf at 30 degrees anyway, haha.

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    I have been playing the DT Solo for a long time -- in the first iteration, when it was identified on the box as 90 compression, and since it's second coming a couple of years ago. I switched to NXT Tours when the Solos went away for a while, but I am delighted that they are back. They are perfect for my swing speed, shot shape and trajectory. Just got back from playing one day at 60 degrees and today at 50 degrees -- I just add a club when it gets colder, mostly because I've always felt that the air is heavier.

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    Me, I play a small white ball that has dimples on it. There is always a script logo on said ball that says Titleist. To me, thats the one and only key.

    Other than that, everything else happens between our ears.

    Hit the ball. Find the ball. Hit it again. Get it in the hole.......

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    Tar Heel
    Me, I play a small white ball that has dimples on it. There is always a script logo on said ball that says Titleist. To me, thats the one and only key.

    Other than that, everything else happens between our ears.

    Hit the ball. Find the ball. Hit it again. Get it in the hole.......

    Just nut it! :-)

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    I can't do that Don. Apparently. But I can play a Titleist.....