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Another question for the Pros/Serious Amateurs in the Community

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    I was at the range this afternoon working with my new 714s (Thanks Titleist!!) figuring out trajectories and trying to dial in some distances with these really very nice irons. There was a pretty strong breeze today - cold front approaching - and I was having some fun trying to cut and hold iron shots into the breeze..That got me thinking about how the pros look at the breeze and a question: We've all seen pros analyzing a shot , caddying tossing a bit of grass, players scanning the tree tops, while the announcers on TV talk about  the breeze and I look in vain at what looks to be  still tableau with little to no breeze.How much of a factor is a gentle little breeze? Are these guys so tuned in that the input of a wisp of breeze can make a difference in their shot calculations? 10 or 25  or 2o MPN breeze, sure. It has an effect. But is this simply analytical overkill or does a three MPH breeze really have an effect on the flight and direction of a shot?

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    Pete, those guys are really dialed in on their shots....the more spin and loft on the ball, the more effect the wind will have on the ball......some guys like to hit high soft lofting shots and even a small amount of wind will effect it's pattern.......wish I were that accurate....

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    Chuck is right.  Most of us don't play enough to really realize the differences.  Then again a solid shot will not be affected by wind as a slight miss hit.  They hit it solid almost always, the ones that are on TV that week any way.

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    Wind is probably the most under estimated effect by most ams, depending on the shot shape, (draw riding the wind, cut into the wind, ect) what we think is a slight breeze can have a tremendous effect.  Most pros, especially in the "scoring zone" are very precise with yardages and a "slight breeze" can effect a shot 2-3 yards which is a lot to those guys, the difference between a 10 ft putt for bird or 20 ft

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    One of the best things learned was that a wind into you always hurts more than you think and a helping wind never helps as much as you think. Don't over swing on either.

    I may be wrong but I do believe the guys from the persimmon generation were more creative in playing the wind shots.

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    Pete, I play on a links type course and the wind can have an incredible effects.

    It's really all about the trajectory but a well struck shot will usually not be too affected unless it's a pretty stiff breeze.

    What gets the pros on those treelined courses with swirling winds though is trying to work out the exact direction (I'm sure everybody has had one of those rounds where it feels like every shot is into the wind) as they are playing to exact yardages to get access to some of those pins and realistic birdie chances.

    The art of knowing how far you hit the ball is one of the most important aspects of this game and it is simply amazing how many guys and gals I see with the most wizbang lasers/gps units that wouldn't have a clue how far they can hit the ball especially on long par threes and into the wind.

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    I agree Cole, I see it all the time in college tournaments. Guys will miss it well right or left of the green and complain that the wind just "took it." Well it's wind, it's up there, play it! I always play a little extra with the wind and for the most part I ride the wind whenever possible. As far as how much the wind will have an affect on the ball, I try to look at the trees and think to myself "So the wind is pushing that tree branch around pretty good, I'm guessing it's going to push a ball pretty good as well." Of course practice those shots with the wind to understand how the wind works with your shots.

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    Growing up in Oklahoma afforded me the opportunity to hone my wind game.  The affect the wind can have on your shot and thinking can cause bad decisions quickly.  My advice is to work on that aspect of your game during practice so that you are prepared when the conditions dictate those shots.

    TT

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    I'd like to add a question to this thread, I hope you dont mind. I have read that wind coming from left to right will shorten your distance whereas a right to left wind will actually increase your distance. This is apparently regardless of whether one is lefty or righty. Anyone know why this is so? Similarly, fades shorten and draws lengthen your distances - I dont think this would be true of the side spin rate was the same, no? Can anyone explain? Thanks in advance.

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    It seems to me even the slightest breeze has some effect. For example, if a crosswind is 5 MPH or 1.47 feet per second, if the ball stays in the air for 10 seconds, it should move 14.7 feet. Also, consider the effect of temperature. As for the effect of a crosswind being L to R, or R to L, I can't see it having any effect unless you curve the ball with or into the direction of the wind. It makes me wonder if a crosswind does affect the turbulence created by backspin that provides lift to the ball and therefore, causes the ball to no carry as far..

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    JosephR
    I'd like to add a question to this thread, I hope you dont mind. I have read that wind coming from left to right will shorten your distance whereas a right to left wind will actually increase your distance. This is apparently regardless of whether one is lefty or righty. Anyone know why this is so? Similarly, fades shorten and draws lengthen your distances - I dont think this would be true of the side spin rate was the same, no? Can anyone explain? Thanks in advance.

    i think, typically a draw will roll more and a fade will land softer.  but i don't know how wind would affect that.  i would think wind in either direction would produce similar results.