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Golf Balls -- How to identify the year/model

    • 4913 points
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    So I'm not a pure "Titleist" ball guy yet and have been testing out the Bridgestones, Wilsons, and Titleist for a "reasonably" priced ball that still is soft off the putter, good around the greens, and long off the tee. The ProV's and 330's are just priced too high, for my budget, to use all the time.

    Anyway, my question is that while rummaging through my golf drawer, I realized that I had a few sleeves of a ball that I've been meaning to try out -- the NXT Tour and also a sleeve of NXT Extremes.  Given the annual "updates" that the ball companies are pushing out, how the heck can I figure out what year/model I'm actually hitting. These could be a year old or five.  I can't seem to spot any year designation on the box or the balls.

    Any thoughts on how to identify these? I've read that newer NXT Tours are good ProV alternative but that the older ones are a bit too hardY ) ***being kind here).

    (I found this thread on the FJC from a few years back http://www.footjoy.com/community/discussions/f/22/t/1608.aspx?pi392=1)

    Thanks!

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    NXT Extremes are several years old, I can try to lock down a year tomorrow.  A photo of the side stamp will help greatly towards determining what year it is.

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    You can purchase prior generation ProV1s at Dicks and some other stores that are discounted if that would help your budget if you really like the ball.......I love the ball myself and love the feel and can tell the difference.......they are the 2012 models, I believe.....they are usually priced in he 30s........cz : )

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    on the ProV's

    This years model 2013 has a light grey arrow marking while the version before has dark black arrow markings...

    • 4913 points
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    Thanks Devin! Here are pics of the NXT Tour and the Extreme. The tours are packaged in Yellow/Black. The Extremes in Yellow/Red. 

    • 4913 points
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    Should have added that on the NXT's one sleeve is stamped "New" and says "Low Spin, Dual Core Design" while the other says "Advanced, Dual Core Design". Other than that they look identical (e.g. same logo, colour, etc).  The "NXT Extreme" says "Extreme Distance with Soft Feel"

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    miniwarmth
    Should have added that on the NXT's one sleeve is stamped "New" and says "Low Spin, Dual Core Design" while the other says "Advanced, Dual Core Design". Other than that they look identical (e.g. same logo, colour, etc).  The "NXT Extreme" says "Extreme Distance with Soft Feel"

     

    The side stamp will be enough - they change every time the ball changes.

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    Devin_Gmitter
    miniwarmthShould have added that on the NXT's one sleeve is stamped "New" and says "Low Spin, Dual Core Design" while the other says "Advanced, Dual Core Design". Other than that they look identical (e.g. same logo, colour, etc).  The "NXT Extreme" says "Extreme Distance with Soft Feel"  

    The side stamp will be enough - they change every time the ball changes.

    The  "< NXT - Tour >"  is from 2005 to 2008

    <-----NXT Extreme-----> is slightly newer, it could of been made anytime from 2008 to 2010.

    • 2712 points
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    I was fortunate to spend some time at  a  major golf ball factory  while at a business meeting.  I asked one of the engineers  about the advisability of using  "older" golf balls. The answer was that golf balls lose about 10% of their potential during the first 90 days after manufacture and after 90 days the performance does not deteriorate.  The downside to using older balls is just one of improvements in design and technology.

    • 2956 points
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    zacho
    I was fortunate to spend some time at  a  major golf ball factory  while at a business meeting.  I asked one of the engineers  about the advisability of using  "older" golf balls. The answer was that golf balls lose about 10% of their potential during the first 90 days after manufacture and after 90 days the performance does not deteriorate.  The downside to using older balls is just one of improvements in design and technology.

    90 days isn't very long. Does anyone have an idea how long, on average, a "new" box of balls sits on a shelf in a store or pro shop, or in a warehouse waiting sale or distribution?

    • 4913 points
    • Posts: 1082
     

    I had no idea they were that old. Don't think I'll even use them in my "test" group.

    • 4913 points
    • Posts: 1082
     

    zacho
    The answer was that golf balls lose about 10% of their potential during the first 90 days after manufacture and after 90 days the performance does not deteriorate.  The downside to using older balls is just one of improvements in design and technology.

    @Zacho -- This is great information that I've never heard before.    That's a pretty significant loss.