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How to wash your gloves

    • 3627 points
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    Nice tip. I might try this with a couple old gloves I have lying around later. Will report back.

    • 787 points
    • Posts: 79
     

    Is the water cold, warm, or hot?    Thanks!

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    808HACKER
    Is the water cold, warm, or hot?    Thanks!

    I have always used cold water, but it probably doesn't matter. Since the big problem I have is salt buildup, warm water water might work better. I have to wash 3 gloves out and will try warmer water as a test.

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    This is all new to me.  I have typically just thrown the used gloves in my bag and used them when it rains.  I will blow through a few of these during the round.  

    I have always went out and purchased new gloves, but will have to give this a shot.  I think I must have about 20 PTL's sitting in a plastic bag in my garage.

    Thanks for the tip.

    -Brian

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    Well, the warmer water works well. I took a couple of gloves from last summer that were very crusty from sweat/salt and rinsed one in cold water, the other in very warm water. The warm water seems to have removed more salt, both are playable now.

    • 5550 points
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    Fred,

    Thanks for the DIY glove cleaning tutorial. I tried it yesterday glove looks great.

    MMW

    • 1466 points
    • Posts: 349
     

    Thanks for the tip! Will this help prevent/slow down wear or only make it look cleaner?

    • 256 points
    • Posts: 18
     

    I just put my glove in a pants pocket, then wash the pants. Works very well. Then I lay out the glove on a towel and let it dry.

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    Hmmmm - that might work very well, Carl. My only concern is detergent not getting fully rinsed out and causing irritation. As for Gzink's question, washing them doesn't really slow down the wear, it just makes them last longer because the leather doesn't *** from the salt drying out the leather. It also makes them look a lot cleaner. When you wash them in the sink, you'll be amazed as to how dirty the water gets. At least I was.

    • 256 points
    • Posts: 18
     

    Next time I just might "rinse" out my glove after the wash. Also, I always clean my grips after every round. Just a few minutes of care can make all this great equipment last a little longer. The older I get, the more I learn.

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    Good idea Carl - last night, I tried washing my gloves by filling the sink with warm water, washing them a bit, then let them soak for a couple of hours. This morning, they were dry and it seems more salt was removed.

    • 5399 points
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    Carl -- tried it as well.   The dark spots/grime haven't really come out but If I can get a bit more life out of my FJ gloves I'll be a happy man.   Am over in India and FJ gloves are more expensive (not that readily available).  I tend to opt for Srixon as my backup.

    • 256 points
    • Posts: 18
     

    Seems that the All Weather type gloves take a washing rather well. Washing never gets all the dirt out but they look so much better. Keep them in a zip lock baggie after the round too.

    • 1362 points
    • Posts: 303
     

    eagle3, Did you use the Kiwi mink oil?

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    miniwarmth
    Carl -- tried it as well.   The dark spots/grime haven't really come out but If I can get a bit more life out of my FJ gloves I'll be a happy man.   Am over in India and FJ gloves are more expensive (not that readily available).  I tend to opt for Srixon as my backup.

    miniwartmth, if you let them soak a few hours, more salt will come out and, as they are hanging to dry, the dark spots can be stretched a bit.