How does footjoy test rain suits?

How does footjoy test rain suits?

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    Given the fiasco at the Ryder cup, and comments from Tiger this week, how does Footjoy go about testing rainwear.  I would think there would need to be testing on design, but also in production. 

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    A great qusetion! Chris, can you gives us the details?

    I do know from my experience that I have NEVER been wet while wearing my FJ rain gear so however they do it, it seems to work.

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    Ah yes, this is indeed an interesting request. Love to know.

    Also, do you work directly with engineers from the WL Gore company (makers of Gore Tex), or do your own development with their materials.

    I might have asked a proprietary question there, so if I did, sorry.

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    This is a great question Tony.  First it should be known that the Tour Collection outerwear is comprised of a couple of different layers.  The outerlayer or shell is a teflon coated stretch woven material designed to bead up and shed water on contact.  This material is what keeps the pieces from absorbing water and gaining weight.  This is where the Ryder Cup team ran into trouble, as the pieces they were wearing were a knit fabric which caused them to absorb the moisture and gain weight, all while giving them a cool, damp feeling.  The true waterproof part of our jacket comes from the next layer or the liner just underneath the shell.  This is the part of the garmet that will keep you totally dry.  The material goes through what is known as a water column pressure test to see how much water pressure it can withstand.  Basically, water is shot downward through a tube with a certain level of pressure to see how much this fabric can protect against.  That being said, ours is measured to withstand pressure far greater than you will ever experience on the golf course.  I hope this helps!

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    Simple, during a hurricane they give them to the news reporters to see what works and what doesn't.  :)

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    I have worn mine in what seem like a hurricane, horizontal rain in 30-35 MPH winds. Have to love playing in the UK sometimes. The only thing that would be dryer is Patagonia Foul Weather Sailing Gear!!

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    Fougere18

    This is a great question Tony.  First it should be known that the Tour Collection outerwear is comprised of a couple of different layers.  The outerlayer or shell is a teflon coated stretch woven material designed to bead up and shed water on contact.  This material is what keeps the pieces from absorbing water and gaining weight.  This is where the Ryder Cup team ran into trouble, as the pieces they were wearing were a knit fabric which caused them to absorb the moisture and gain weight, all while giving them a cool, damp feeling.  The true waterproof part of our jacket comes from the next layer or the liner just underneath the shell.  This is the part of the garmet that will keep you totally dry.  The material goes through what is known as a water column pressure test to see how much water pressure it can withstand.  Basically, water is shot downward through a tube with a certain level of pressure to see how much this fabric can protect against.  That being said, ours is measured to withstand pressure far greater than you will ever experience on the golf course.  I hope this helps!

    Does this waterproof layer also allow for breathe-ability so there is no moisture build up on the inside?

    • Posts: 13
     

    bholley

    Fougere18

    This is a great question Tony.  First it should be known that the Tour Collection outerwear is comprised of a couple of different layers.  The outerlayer or shell is a teflon coated stretch woven material designed to bead up and shed water on contact.  This material is what keeps the pieces from absorbing water and gaining weight.  This is where the Ryder Cup team ran into trouble, as the pieces they were wearing were a knit fabric which caused them to absorb the moisture and gain weight, all while giving them a cool, damp feeling.  The true waterproof part of our jacket comes from the next layer or the liner just underneath the shell.  This is the part of the garmet that will keep you totally dry.  The material goes through what is known as a water column pressure test to see how much water pressure it can withstand.  Basically, water is shot downward through a tube with a certain level of pressure to see how much this fabric can protect against.  That being said, ours is measured to withstand pressure far greater than you will ever experience on the golf course.  I hope this helps!

    Does this waterproof layer also allow for breathe-ability so there is no moisture build up on the inside?

     

    This is another great question...   I was focused mainly on the waterproof qualities and the testing that the piece goes through, that I left out some other keys features & benefits to the materials used in these pieces.  The "liner" and "shell" that I was mentioning before are two materials that are actually laminated to together.  They are designed not only to completely waterproof the jacket in the before mentioned ways, but they are also designed to keep the cold from coming in, but also to release heat out, thus making the piece extremely breatheable.   So in short, yes these pieces are very breathable!  I hope that clarifies things a little further for you.

     

     

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    Does this technology also allow for moisture to escape while still being waterproof (it can't get in but it can get out)

    • Posts: 13
     

    bholley

    Does this technology also allow for moisture to escape while still being waterproof (it can't get in but it can get out)

     

       The garmet is breatheable, which would mean that it allows moisture and heat out and will not suffocate you.  It does not have the moisture wicking properties of the baselayer and some of our golf shirts, but those are designed to pull moisture directly from your body and I assume that this particular piece will never be worn directly against your body.  I hope this helps.

     

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    Thanks,

    I had noticed some difference between some of my FJ's and Gore-Tex. The FJ was more comfortable temperature wise while the gore-tex seemed to hold in too much heat.

     

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    I've heard that the best way to test is to put the jacket on a fabric chair and spray it with a hose. Then take the jacket off and examine the inside for temperature, moistness, and then examine the chair fabric.

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    FP17

    Too high tech.

    Just go old school,  put it on and play in the rain.

    Deno

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    I would completely agree.  The FJ outerware is great.  It is even good on the cold days, where it shelters you from the cold breezes.